Raymond Hao-Tien Huang

by Tina Yu-Ting from Taipei

You have to have faith in what you are. When you die, everything on earth would be pointless; everything exists because you exist. So cheer up and do what you’re supposed to do.
Dad, mom, bro and I (At the home parking lot in Canada)
Dad, mom, bro and I (At the home parking lot in Canada)

Raymond Haotien Huang is my father. He was born in a poor town in Taiwan. Despite his poverty background, he worked hard to get into a decent university, which was an almost impossible achievement in his hometown. After he graduated from university, he tried a variety of jobs. He is currently working as a stock manager at a big insurance company. He is a role model to me, for he did not give up on making a better life just because of a poor environment. And he is my hero because he is devoted to the ones he loves, and he lives a meaningful life by always giving and learning.

Raymond Haotien Huang is a devoted husband and father. He refuses to stay late hours at work. He prefers to just come home and spend time with us. He wakes up earlier than he has to and prepares breakfast for the family.

My dad would commute long hours to a certain destination just to get something for us. He would spend a weekend to look through our exam papers in order to teach us the best way to study. My dad is someone who wisely offers his time and everything he has to his family, for he strongly believes that family is the most precious treasure anyone can own.

Dad and I cooling in the toy pool. (In the backyard of our home in Canada.)
Dad and I cooling in the toy pool. (In the backyard of our home in Canada.)

My dad has a tuna fish belly; he is 169.5 centimeters tall, and he has a brilliant mind full of profound thoughts and ideas. Whenever I have problems in relationships, homework or emotions, I share them with him, for he always seems to understand my thoughts and situation, and he is always ready to give wise advice from his store of knowledge. I recently was troubled by being lonely in a group of people, and I felt that I was in a pool of indifference. I was very uncomfortable and discouraged, and when I could not handle it anymore, I turned to my father. He gave me some different views of the situation, some suggestions, and his special thought about life: “You have to have faith in what you are. When you die, everything on earth would be pointless, everything exists because you exist. So cheer up and do what you’re supposed to do.”

Dad likes to meditate. He benefits the most he can from life’s experiences and then combines the essence of what he has learned into a new acknowledgment. I learn a lot from his unique perspectives of life. When I am pressured by school exams and what grades I’ll get, he tells me to try my best and not to waste a second thinking about useless, time-consuming things. He says that taking an exam is like fighting a war. When a soldier is out in a war, he does not have time to think about how he will die or how many enemies he can injure; he only focuses on his gun and what he needs to do in the present moment, and anything else he thinks will become his ticket to hell. I really admire his way of thinking and I have benefited a lot from learning to do so.

Dad and the children  (Legendary Dragon Lake near the Rocky Mountains)
Dad and the children (Legendary Dragon Lake near the Rocky Mountains)

I am deeply grateful to God for granting such a marvelous daddy for me. I once said when I was little, and I still agree with it now, “Nobody seems as much like a dad than my daddy!” Raymond Haotien Huang is truly a loving husband, a fun dad, and a wonderful friend to turn to.

Page created on 6/17/2015 8:06:48 PM

Last edited 1/5/2017 11:19:12 PM