STORIES
Women

Sacagawea

by Hope from Loveland

Native American woman with baby (becuo.com)
Native American woman with baby (becuo.com)

Imagine if you were kidnapped as a kid. You are then gambled or sold. Wouldn't you want to give up and feel like you couldn't go on? But Sacagawea did the exact opposite. She showed endurance, selflessness, and dedication.

Even though Sacagawea was a woman, she had extreme endurance. To start off her life, she was kidnapped at age twelve by Hidatsas. Then Sacagawea was either won by a gamble or bought to be Toussaint Charbonneau's second wife. To add to this huge load, she was pregnant right before going on the Lewis and Clark journey along the Missouri River to find new land. She went because her husband was hired as an interpreter for them. Wow what a life!

During her lifetime she showed selflessness even when she was going through rough times herself. First off, she went on the Lewis and Clark Expedition with a newborn to care for. And if you didn't know, taking care of a newborn is hard work because they cry and always need attention. That's not all she had to do. She also had interpret a little along that strenuous journey. Since she knew certain native American languages that her interpreter husband didn't.

Last but not least, Sacagawea showed dedication during her life. Since she was a woman, she proved to dangerous tribes that they only wanted peace because women back then didn't fight. Sacagawea provided horses for everyone on the expedition from her long lost tribe. Her short life was lived with dedication and she was born in 1788 then died at almost 30.

Sacagawea lived her short life to the full with endurance, selflessness, and dedication. This proves to all women that they can be heroes too. So, if you are feeling down, think about Sacagawea's heroic qualities. Women change the world too.

Page created on 3/6/2015 11:53:37 PM

Last edited 3/6/2015 11:53:37 PM

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