Osceola

by Jordon S.

Osceola was a member of the Seminoles, a tribe of people native to the Southeastern part of what is now the United States. He was born in Macon County, Ala., in 1804. Shortly after his birth, he and his mother moved to Florida. At that time, Florida was owned by Spain. In 1828, Florida was bought by the U.S. Five years later, an American general wanted to buy the Seminoles' land. One famous myth about Osceola is that when a U.S. general presented the Seminoles with a purchase contract, Osceola stabbed the paper. In truth, he was a part of that group of Seminoles that chose going to war over leaving their lands.

Osceola fought the United States for 10 years. He hadn't lost yet, but finally became tired of war. He was ready to talk peace. General Thomas Jessup raised a white "truce" flag, but at the peace talks, Jessup's army captured Osceola. The citizens of South Carolina as well as people around the world thought this was a terrible trick. Newspapers printed his story. Artists painted his portrait. Osceola died in prison.

Page created on 8/11/2014 10:45:19 AM

Last edited 1/6/2017 4:06:33 PM

Related Links

The People's Paths - North American Indian and Indigenous People
Documents Relating to American Foreign Policy Before 1898 - From the Mount Holyoke College International Relations Department

Extra Info

The above portrait of Osceola was painted by a Charleston, South Carolina artist Robert John Curtis in 1838.

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