STORIES
Young Heroes

Ruby Bridges

by Carlo Martinez from San Diego, California in United States

"The next year, Ruby started second grade. She walked into her new class. The room was full of white and African-American children!"

 

“True equality means holding everyone accountable in the same way, regardless of race, gender, faith, ethnicity - or political ideology” (Monica Crowley). Nineteen-sixty was dark time for people of color. Ruby Bridges was a very positive person in such a dark time, when people judged others by the color of their skin. She learned that it shouldn't matter how you look and that you should give people a chance. Young six-year-old Ruby Bridges went to first grade at an all-white school, where she learned that the color of your skin means a lot. Ruby Bridges grew up in Tylertown, Mississippi. Born September 8, 1954, Ruby Bridges starts the first grade six years later. In 1995 she founded the Ruby Bridges Education Foundation to promote interracial harmony. A hero must possess leadership and bravery. 

Ruby Bridges is a leader and brave, therefore she is a hero.

134285Ruby Bridges being escorted Uncredited DOJ photographer [Public domain]Ruby is a leader, which is a quality of a hero.

134287Ruby BridgesTexas A&M University-Commerce Marketing Communications Photography [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]In history up until this time, people of color were segregated and unable to attend school with people who were white. There had to be a forerunner to make a change so we could all go to school together. "The next year, Ruby started second grade. She walked into her new class. The room was full of white and African-American children” (Falk Laine). Because of Ruby Bridges there is a more diverse group of kids who go to school. It's no longer just white people or rich people, everyone has the chance to learn and go to school. Ruby is a leader; she was one of the first African Americans to go to an all-white school in the South. She made a difference. Now all people have an opportunity to learn and go to school. Now it doesn't matter the color of your skin, everyone is given a chance to learn.

Ruby Bridges was a young, smart African American. At a young age, she was exposed to racism and bullying because of the color of her skin. But she learned to get past it and she makes a change in the world. "She held her head high and walked right into the school. Ruby All Alone" (Rainsford Blair). Ruby Bridges must have felt super alone in her classroom. It was her and her teacher; she really had no one to talk to and when she left the school, she got yelled at for being black.

In such a dark time, she saw positivity in the world. She believed that everyone should be treated the same and that you should not be judged by the color of your skin.

Ruby Bridges made a change in how people think by making education for all people no matter the color of their skin and that everyone should be given a chance. Ruby was also pretty lonely being the only African American to go to the school and having to be escorted by security guards. But she stayed strong and changed the law. Ruby Bridges was changing the world and she didn't let people stop her or make her feel like she was nothing. He walked into the school proud. "Ruby Bridges is an American hero: In the face of really violent opposition, this young girl took steps to ensure that the schools would be integrated" (Gale Ruby Bridges). She was getting bullied at a really young age. But she learned to keep her head up high. Ruby Bridges learned that the world was a rough place to be in, and because she was colored she went head to head with violence, and it led to integration. Now there are many cultures in schools. Ruby Bridges was a strong young girl who got bullied, but she changed the culture of the schools. She learned how to zero out the haters, and because of that, she changed the way school works. It helps because there are different cultures at school and everyone gets the chance to learn. She walked into school with people yelling at her, which she did not want, and she is a leader to all the students who came after her. She is an inspiration for never giving up and always showing up to school.

Ruby Bridges is brave. She always went school and never gave up even when there was an angry crowd of lions who wanted to kill her. “Forty years ago, a 6-year-old girl named Ruby Bridges marched past an angry mob of segregationists to become the first black child to attend William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans.” She is fearless and doesn't let people get to her. She also changed school forever by never giving up and going to school as one of the first African Americans. We need to all get over the color of skin, and everyone should have to right to learn and be themselves.

 

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Crowley, Monica. “True equality means holding everyone accountable in the same way, regardless of race, gender, faith, ethnicity or political ideology.” Brainy quote famous quotes.

Rainsford, Blair.

Falk, Laine. "Ruby's Story." Scholastic News/Weekly Reader Edition 1, Feb. 2019, p. 2B+. Student Resources In Context, https://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A570820123/SUIC?u=powa9245&sid=SUIC&xid=5997b713. Accessed 3 May 2019.

 

Khadaroo, Stacy Teicher. "Civil rights pioneer: 'You almost feel like you're back in the '60s.'." Christian Science Monitor, 14 Nov. 2014. Student Resources In Context, https://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A390140474/SUIC?u=powa9245&sid=SUIC&xid=27ca0944. Accessed 3 May 2019.

 

"Ruby Bridges." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2009. Biography In Context, https://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/K1650006303/BIC?u=powa9245&sid=BIC&xid=61e88bd0. Accessed 2 May 2019.

 

"Ruby the Brave: Fifty-eight years ago, this little girl helped make a big change in our country, just by going to school. How did she do it?" Scholastic News/Weekly Reader Edition 2, Feb. 2018, p. S1+. Student Resources In Context,

https://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A527473387/SUIC?u=powa9245&sid=SUIC&xid=775f8875. Accessed 3 May 2019



Page created on 5/28/2019 8:39:33 PM

Last edited 6/4/2019 7:39:08 PM

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