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Amelia Earhart

by Kim Phan from San Diego

"The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward."-Amelia Earhart
Amelia Earhart (http://www.usconsulate.org.hk/pas/kids/ad.htm (Consulate General of the United States Hong Kong &  Macau))
Amelia Earhart (http://www.usconsulate.org.hk/pas/kids/ad.htm (Consulate General of the United States Hong Kong & Macau))

" 'It was a thing of rusty wire and wood and not at all interesting.' " (Burke, John). If you actually think about it, it is just plain irony. One historical figure known to be the first woman pilot to fly around the world was the same one who said, when she was young, that it was not in a slight interest to her. That woman was Amelia Earhart, born in a small town, Atchison, Kansas in July 24, 1897. When Earhart was young, in 1908, she was not interested in flight, "It was a thing of rusty wire and wood and not at all interesting." (Burke, John). In 1918, she became a Voluntary Aid Detachment Nurse, though it was an interesting job, it did seem like the perfect occupation for her. When she took her first ride in a plane, in 1920, and left off the ground, she remarked, "I knew I myself had to fly" (Sherman, Stephen). And so she pursued her dream of flight and became a pilot. She performed great courage to do such a far-fetched goal and had passion towards what she liked to do, showing others that they could follow her footsteps onto a pathway full of possibilities and nothing could hold them back.

http://www.deejay51.com/amelia_earhart.htm (Dee Jay)
http://www.deejay51.com/amelia_earhart.htm (Dee Jay)

Earhart's achievement of flying across the Atlantic takes courage. She demonstrated courage throughout her life either in being the first woman to fly around the world, and even having such an occupation that men mostly occupied. For a woman to be an aviator was rare and a sight to see, but some were biased towards it. Some didn't think that women could do the same jobs as men could, but thought women should stay home and take care of the family. But Amelia Earhart was never that kind of person, but a dreamer who achieved her goal of flight across the Atlantic. "Amelia remains a symbol of the power and perseverance of American women, and the adventurous spirit so essential to the American persona" (Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum). She inspired other people that others must achieve their goal in their best effort. Their dream, impossible or not, must be tried, if failed, be open towards for another dream to form. Earhart's acts of courage had inspired others, not only as a woman hero, but also as a brave and adventurous soul.

Amelia Earhart with googles and leather hat. (http://www.biography.com/people/amelia-earhart-9283280/photos (1996?2012 A+E Television Networks, LLC.))
Amelia Earhart with googles and leather hat. (http://www.biography.com/people/amelia-earhart-9283280/photos (1996?2012 A+E Television Networks, LLC.))

Having such a passion towards flying because such a woman living in the discrimination towards women, and thought that they were not able to have the same jobs as men. Though living in a tough time where males were dominant in the occupation world, she kept her dream of being a pilot and was the first woman to travel across the Atlantic. "She was the first woman to cross the Atlantic by airplane (1928) and the first woman to make a solo flight across the Atlantic (1932)" (Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition). For a woman to do such an endeavor was an impressive action, and an achievement to reach her goal for Earhart. She kept pursuing her dream, even whenever she was short on money, "Learning to fly in California, she took up aviation as a hobby, taking odd jobs to pay for her flying lessons" (Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum). Instead of giving up on her goal, to become an aviator, she kept her dream and took any job to pay for her lessons. So she didn't quit just because of money was tight. Allowing no obstacle stand in front of her towards reaching her goals, she kept pursuing and never lost track. Being so passionate towards what she appreciated, being a pilot. And letting nothing stop her to achieve her dream, which was to fly around the world.

Amelia Earhart (http://hawaii.gov/hawaiiaviation/hawaii-aviation-pioneers/amelia-earhart-1 (Hawaii Aviation))
Amelia Earhart (http://hawaii.gov/hawaiiaviation/hawaii-aviation-pioneers/amelia-earhart-1 (Hawaii Aviation))

"I want to do it because I want to do it. Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail their failure must be but a challenge to others" (George Palmer Puttman). As Amelia Earhart once wrote to her husband, George, before her sudden disappearance, she wanted to show him that it was her decision to be a pilot. Her goal to achieve what was thought to be impossible and her dream that people must follow their instincts. She inspired others around the nation to follow their dreams, seeming impossible or not, and try all their might to achieve their goal. Follow what you think is right and don't let anyone hold you back. Be open around your surroundings because you never know what may interest you. Show your dedication towards your interest and have a goal, teach others that they could do the same if they place their best effort into whatever they do. Who would have known, that such a naive child, would come back as one of the most historical women in the nation. Upon reaching a goal, keep in mind the sky is the limit, demonstrated by Amelia Earhart. An inspirational aviator who achieved being the first woman to fly around the world solo, which Earhart was. Though there is much more to Amelia Earhart than just knowing that she is the first woman to fly around the Atlantic, but also she is an inspiration to many, and also a hero because she is also a symbol of the power and perseverance of American Women.

Works Cited

Burke, John. Winged Legend: The Life of Amelia Earhart. New York: Berkley Publishing, 1970.

Birthplace Museum, Amelia Earhart. "Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum." [Online] Available http://www.ameliaearhartmuseum.org/index.html.

Sherman, Stephen. "Aviatrix Lost Over The Pacific." [Online] Available http://acepilots.com/earhart.html. 2008.

Puttman, George Palmer. Last Flight. Crown Publishers, 1988.

Page created on 4/19/2012 1:06:16 PM

Last edited 4/19/2012 1:06:16 PM

The beliefs, viewpoints and opinions expressed in this hero submission on the website are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the beliefs, viewpoints and opinions of The MY HERO Project and its staff.

Related Links

Biography Amelia Earhart - Biography
Amelia Earhart Museum - Biography of Amelia Earhart
Naval History & Heritage - Amelia Earhart Information
Kansas Historical Society - HIstory of Amelia Earhart
International Organization of Women Pilots - Timeline of Amelia Earhart